Frequently Asked Questions

 

 
  • Why do I need a responsible adult to drive me home and stay with me? After receiving any type of anesthesia or sedation, the law requires that you do not drive as it would be considered “Driving Under the Influence.” 
  • Why can I not drive myself home after light sedation? Even though you may feel normal after light sedation, you are under the influence of an opioid and or benzodiazepine. These affect your cognitive processes and you would be considered “Under the Influence.”
  • Why is it so important to follow the “Nothing by Mouth” rules? If you have food or fluid in your stomach your gastric juices will be active. During the induction of anesthesia, some patients may have an active gag reflex and potentially your acidic stomach contents could be vomited up and get into your lungs. This is called aspiration, and can be a life- threatening situation.
  • After I register at the front desk, why do other patients get called back before me? There are many factors that could affect the time in which you are called to pre-op. One is that there are usually 3-4 doctors operating at any given time, so even though you may have arrived before another patient, pre-op may have to prepare another doctor’s patient as that doctor may be waiting. Also, if your doctor is behind schedule and other doctors are on their timeline, the nurses need to get those other patients prepped. Also, different doctors request their patients to be here 2 hours in advance, while others schedule their patients to be here only one hour in advance. If you have any question about your wait time, please talk to the receptionist.
  • Why do you ask that I not wear jewelry and remove all piercings? Jewelry can easily get snagged in the linen. Also, if a ring or bracelet is on the operative arm, they could act as a tourniquet and negatively affect circulation to your hand.
  • When will my family/friends be allowed to be with me in pre-op? If you have special needs or the patient is a minor, family may come back immediately into pre-op. Usually, we ask the family to wait in the waiting room until we have fully prepped the patient and then we invite you to come sit at the patient’s bedside.
  • Why is it so cold in the Center? There are certain infection control standards that we must follow. These standards dictate the temperature and humidity control settings.
  • Why do I need to remove my clothes for very simple procedures? The surgical suite is considered a sterile setting and once again there are Surgical Standards of Care which dictate that no street clothes should be worn in the Operating Room setting.
  • When does the doctor speak with the family? Most doctors come to the waiting room and speak to you there. Some doctors wait until the patient is more awake in Recovery and will ask for you to be brought to Recovery to speak to both you and the patient. If you leave the Center for any reason and miss the doctor you may not be able to see him/her again and will have to call the office if you want to speak directly to them.
  • When will my family be allowed in Recovery? Once the patient has met our criteria for discharge (anywhere from 30 minutes-1 hour) we will allow family in to help dress the patient and review all discharge instructions. Please understand that some patients awaken more slowly than others and will be in Recovery longer. Generally, if a patient is in Recovery greater than 1.5 hours, the nurse will come speak to you and update you.
  • Why do I have to be taken to the car by wheelchair? We want to keep you safe as your balance may be “off” after anesthesia. It is our job to get you safely into your vehicle.